Upcoming Webinar on Law, Religion, and Covid

A programming note: next Friday, October 2, at 11:00 am, the Center will co-host a webinar, “Law, Religion, and Coronavirus in the United States: A Six-Month Assessment.” The webinar will feature commentary from law professors, law students, and lawyers on the implications of the coronavirus pandemic, as well as economic and racial justice concerns raised over the past six months. Co-sponsors include the International Center for Law and Religion Studies at Brigham Young University Law School; the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University Law School; the Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School; and the Eleanor H. McCullen Center for Law, Religion and Public Policy at Villanova University’s Charles Widger School of Law. The roster of speakers and further details are available here. Hope you can join us for what will be an excellent program!

A New Book on Belonging

Sociologists of religion often distinguish “believing” from “belonging.” There is “belonging without believing”–being formally part of a religious community without having religious convictions–and “believing without belonging”–subscribing to religious claims while remaining formally outside a religious community. For what it’s worth, we Americans tend more towards the latter, especially now, with the rise of the Nones.

Cambridge University Press has released an interesting-looking book by Joseph David (Sapir Academic College, Israel), Kinship, Law and Politics: An Anatomy of Belonging, which no doubt touches on these issues. Here’s the description from the Cambridge site:

Why are we so concerned with belonging? In what ways does our belonging constitute our identity? Is belonging a universal concept or a culturally dependent value? How does belonging situate and motivate us? Joseph E. David grapples with these questions through a genealogical analysis of ideas and concepts of belonging. His book transports readers to crucial historical moments in which perceptions of belonging have been formed, transformed, or dismantled. The cases presented here focus on the pivotal role played by belonging in kinship, law, and political order, stretching across cultural and religious contexts from eleventh-century Mediterranean religious legal debates to twentieth-century statist liberalism in Western societies. With his thorough inquiry into diverse discourses of belonging, David pushes past the politics of belonging and forces us to acknowledge just how wide-ranging and fluid notions of belonging can be.

Princeton’s James Madison Program Announces New Fellowships

Both Marc and I have had the opportunity to serve (at different times) as visiting fellows at Princeton’s James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions. We both enjoyed the experience tremendously and recommend it to anyone with an interest in research and academic exchange. The Program is soliciting applications for fellows for next year. You can find out more here. The deadline is December 1. Questions? Please email Brad Wilson or Matt Franck. (But, really, you should do it!).

Webinar: The 2020 Giussani Series on Faith and Modernity

Webinar: The 2020 Giussani Series on Faith and Modernity

The Crossroads Cultural Center and New York Encounter are hosting a webinar discussing the question of how Christians should engage with major social issues. The webinar is part of the Center’s annual “Giussani Series.” Speakers include Stanley Hauerwas (Duke), John Zuccki (McGill) and Paolo Carozza (Notre Dame).

Participants can register by visiting the following website: tinyurl.com/2020giussani. Additional information is available in the attached materials.

Writing Competition for Law Students: Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School

Writing Competition for Law Students: Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School

The Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School invites submissions on topics and questions related to the intersection of church, state, and society, and in particular how the law structures and governs that intersection. The competition is open to law students in good standing, enrolled in a traditional law degree (J.D. or LL.B.), a Master’s degree (LL.M.), or a doctoral degree (S.J.D./J.S.D. or Ph.D.) program at an ABA-accredited law school within the United States. The competition is also open to recent graduates not yet practicing law (those completing clerkships or engaged in similar pursuits).

Interested scholars can submit full papers (between 9,000-13,000 words) by February 15th, 2021 by emailing Jonathan Hannah (hannah.7@nd.edu) with the subject line “2020 Writing Competition.”

More detailed information and additional instructions for authors are available in the attached file.

Call for Papers for Journal of Law, Religion, and State

Call for Papers for Journal of Law, Religion, and State

The Journal of Law, Religion and State invites submissions for an issue on conversion, proselytization, and secularization, considered in conjunction with democratic values. Interested scholars can submit either full papers (between 8,000-10,000 words) or short case studies (less than 4000 words) through the Submissions link here. Publication is anticipated in 2021.

More detailed information and additional instructions for authors are available in the attached file.

Call for Proposals for Blog Webinar (October 2, 2020)

The Center for Law and Religion at the St. John’s University School of Law invites submissions for a blog conference on Law, Religion, and Coronavirus in the United States: A Six-Month Assessment. The conference, convened with five other co-organizing institutions (the International Center for Law and Religion Studies at Brigham Young University Law School; the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University Law School; the Notre Dame Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School; and the Eleanor H. McCullen Center for Law, Religion and Public Policy at the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law), will focus on the implications for law and religion in the United States of the coronavirus pandemic, as well as the economic and racial justice crises. We welcome papers on the challenge of public health and free exercise; the problems of church finances and state funding of religion; the relationship between science and vaccines; church liability and clergy malpractice issues; the long-term implications of the coronavirus and related crises for law and religion; and so forth.

Interested scholars should submit brief proposals for submission (roughly 100 words) through the “Submissions” page on Emory’s Canopy Forum by August 31st, 2020 (https://canopyforum.org/submit/). Participants will be notified the first week of September whether their proposal has been accepted for inclusion, and complete blog posts will be due by September 25, 2020.


More detailed information is available in the attached file.

Hall Reviews “The Cambridge Companion to the First Amendment and Religious Liberty”

Professor Mark David Hall has this review of The Cambridge Companion to the First Amendment and Religious Liberty, edited by Professors Michael Breidenbach and Owen Anderson. I was pleased to contribute a chapter to the book.

The Cambridge Companion to the First Amendment and Religious Liberty (2020)

This volume is now available for purchase, with many worthwhile and interesting contributions. I have an essay in here as well, The Two Separations.

Check it out!

Conference on Catholic Legal Education: “A Light Unseen”

On February 14, the Center will co-host, along with the Journal of Catholic Legal Studies, a conference on a forthcoming book by Professors John Breen (Loyala University Chicago) and Lee Strang (University of Toledo), “A Light Unseen: A History of Catholic Legal Education.” Panelists include Deans Kathleen Boozang (Seton Hall), Marcus Cole (Notre Dame), Vincent Rougeau (Boston College), Michael Simons (St. John’s), William Treanor (Georgetown), and Robert Vischer (St. Thomas), and Professors Angela Carmella (Seton Hall), Teresa Collett (St. Thomas), Richard Garnett (Notre Dame), Jeff Pojanowski (Notre Dame), and Amy Uelmen (Georgetown). Details and registration are at this link. Hope you can join us!

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