Princeton’s James Madison Program Announces New Fellowships

Both Marc and I have had the opportunity to serve (at different times) as visiting fellows at Princeton’s James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions. We both enjoyed the experience tremendously and recommend it to anyone with an interest in research and academic exchange. The Program is soliciting applications for fellows for next year. You can find out more here. The deadline is December 1. Questions? Please email Brad Wilson or Matt Franck. (But, really, you should do it!).

Webinar: The 2020 Giussani Series on Faith and Modernity

Webinar: The 2020 Giussani Series on Faith and Modernity

The Crossroads Cultural Center and New York Encounter are hosting a webinar discussing the question of how Christians should engage with major social issues. The webinar is part of the Center’s annual “Giussani Series.” Speakers include Stanley Hauerwas (Duke), John Zuccki (McGill) and Paolo Carozza (Notre Dame).

Participants can register by visiting the following website: tinyurl.com/2020giussani. Additional information is available in the attached materials.

Writing Competition for Law Students: Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School

Writing Competition for Law Students: Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School

The Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School invites submissions on topics and questions related to the intersection of church, state, and society, and in particular how the law structures and governs that intersection. The competition is open to law students in good standing, enrolled in a traditional law degree (J.D. or LL.B.), a Master’s degree (LL.M.), or a doctoral degree (S.J.D./J.S.D. or Ph.D.) program at an ABA-accredited law school within the United States. The competition is also open to recent graduates not yet practicing law (those completing clerkships or engaged in similar pursuits).

Interested scholars can submit full papers (between 9,000-13,000 words) by February 15th, 2021 by emailing Jonathan Hannah (hannah.7@nd.edu) with the subject line “2020 Writing Competition.”

More detailed information and additional instructions for authors are available in the attached file.

Call for Papers for Journal of Law, Religion, and State

Call for Papers for Journal of Law, Religion, and State

The Journal of Law, Religion and State invites submissions for an issue on conversion, proselytization, and secularization, considered in conjunction with democratic values. Interested scholars can submit either full papers (between 8,000-10,000 words) or short case studies (less than 4000 words) through the Submissions link here. Publication is anticipated in 2021.

More detailed information and additional instructions for authors are available in the attached file.

Call for Proposals for Blog Webinar (October 2, 2020)

The Center for Law and Religion at the St. John’s University School of Law invites submissions for a blog conference on Law, Religion, and Coronavirus in the United States: A Six-Month Assessment. The conference, convened with five other co-organizing institutions (the International Center for Law and Religion Studies at Brigham Young University Law School; the Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University Law School; the Notre Dame Program on Church, State & Society at Notre Dame Law School; and the Eleanor H. McCullen Center for Law, Religion and Public Policy at the Villanova University Charles Widger School of Law), will focus on the implications for law and religion in the United States of the coronavirus pandemic, as well as the economic and racial justice crises. We welcome papers on the challenge of public health and free exercise; the problems of church finances and state funding of religion; the relationship between science and vaccines; church liability and clergy malpractice issues; the long-term implications of the coronavirus and related crises for law and religion; and so forth.

Interested scholars should submit brief proposals for submission (roughly 100 words) through the “Submissions” page on Emory’s Canopy Forum by August 31st, 2020 (https://canopyforum.org/submit/). Participants will be notified the first week of September whether their proposal has been accepted for inclusion, and complete blog posts will be due by September 25, 2020.


More detailed information is available in the attached file.

Conference on Catholic Legal Education: “A Light Unseen”

On February 14, the Center will co-host, along with the Journal of Catholic Legal Studies, a conference on a forthcoming book by Professors John Breen (Loyala University Chicago) and Lee Strang (University of Toledo), “A Light Unseen: A History of Catholic Legal Education.” Panelists include Deans Kathleen Boozang (Seton Hall), Marcus Cole (Notre Dame), Vincent Rougeau (Boston College), Michael Simons (St. John’s), William Treanor (Georgetown), and Robert Vischer (St. Thomas), and Professors Angela Carmella (Seton Hall), Teresa Collett (St. Thomas), Richard Garnett (Notre Dame), Jeff Pojanowski (Notre Dame), and Amy Uelmen (Georgetown). Details and registration are at this link. Hope you can join us!

International Moot Court Competition in Law & Religion: Rome, March 2020

International Moot Court Competition in Law & Religion: Rome, March 2020

Law students: mark your calendars this spring for a remarkable opportunity in the Eternal City.

The European Academy of Religion is hosting the third International Moot Court Competition in Law and Religion. The competition will take place in Rome from March 5th to March 7th, 2020 and is open to law students in both American and European schools.

Student teams will argue a hypothetical case before two courts, the European Court of Human Rights and the U.S. Supreme Court. Scholars and actual judges from both jurisdictions will serve as judges. After a verdict, a roundtable discussion will debate the varying argumentative skills used and highlight the different cultural points of view of the two Courts.

The program is a wonderful chance for students to build advocacy skills, learn about international legal systems, and engage in legal analysis at the intersection of law and religion. The competition case this year involves a state hospital policy prohibiting employees from wearing visible religious signs in public, and the question of what appropriate accommodations are required by statute.

For more details, as well as entry information, please click here.

Movsesian at the Morningside Institute Tomorrow

For readers in the area, tomorrow night I’ll appear in midtown Manhattan on a panel sponsored by the Morningside Institute, “Church-State Relations in a Time of Scandal.” I’ll be discussing recent state attempts to require clergy to report suspected cases of child abuse, including cases clergy learn about through confidential spiritual counseling, and what these attempts suggest about our changing religious landscape. Details at the link. Stop by and say hello!

Event Next Week on International Religious Freedom

Our friend at Cardozo Law, Faraz Sanei, passes along an announcement for an event in new York next week on international religious freedom, “Mapping the Landscape of International Religious Freedom Policy,” sponsored by the Religious Freedom Institute. Speakers include Sanei and Tom Farr, who spoke at our own conference on international religious freedom in Rome in 2014 (time flies). Looks very worthwhile. Details at the link.

Law & Religion Moot Court at Touro Law

Our friend, Sam Levine, is organizing the sixth annual law and religion moot court competition at Touro Law. The competition will take place next spring, but registration opens in September. Details at the link.

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