Conference: “Geopolitics of Transnational Law and Religion” (Trento, Italy, Apr. 5-6)

On April 5-6, the Bruno Kessler Foundation in Trento, Italy, will host a conference entitled “Geopolitics of Transnational Law and Religion.” The Foundation’s description of the conference follows; more information, including contact information for the conference organizer, can be found here.

fbk_rgbThe aim of this event is to contextualize current events within the global scenario of culture wars through the frame of legal narrative and geopolitical imagery, in which religious factors and variables play a significant role. Legal orders and conscience-related conflicts are therefore understood in the context of a constantly shifting and fragmenting international legal regime.

Symposium: “What Is To Be Done?” (Washington D.C., Apr. 20)

On April 20, the Religious Freedom Institute and the Center for Ethics and Culture at the University of Notre Dame are hosting a symposium titled “What Is To Be Done?: Responding to the Global Persecution of Christians” at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. as part of the Under Ceasar’s Sword Project. A brief description of the event follows:

what-is-to-be-done-symposiumThis one-day symposium will feature the launch of the report, In Response to Persecution, of the Under Caesar’s Sword Project.

How do Christians respond to persecution? How can the rest of the world exercise solidarity with them? This day-long public symposium will propose concrete recommendations for action in response to these questions. It will feature globally prominent speakers on religious freedom and leading scholars of global Christianity. A highlight will be the launch of the report, In Response to Persecution, which conveys the results of the Under Caesar’s Sword project, the world’s first systematic global investigation of Christian responses to persecution, featuring findings from over 25 of the world’s most repressive countries. In attendance at the symposium will be government officials, business leaders, academics, and religious leaders, as well as representatives of non-governmental, human rights, and news organizations.

More information on the symposium can be found here.

Conference: “What are Natural Rights?” (New York, Apr. 1)

On April 1, The Thomistic Institute, jointly with the University of Notre Dame will host a conference titled “What are Natural Rights: Are There Any?” at the Catholic Center at NYU. A brief description of the conference follows:

What are natural right.pngA conference featuring Fr. Dominic Legge, OP (The Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception), Prof. Charles Kesler (Claremont McKenna College), and Prof. Nigel Biggar (Oxford University) and a panel consisting of Sherif Girgis (author of  What Is Marriage? Man and Woman: A Defense), Adrian Vermeule (Harvard University), Chad Pecknold (Catholic University of America) and Vincent Phillip Munoz (Notre Dame University).

More information on the event can be found here.

Call for Papers on Eastern Christianity – American Academy of Religion Annual Meeting

aar_logoFordham University’s Orthodox Christian Studies Center has passed along a call for papers from the American Academy of Religion. The Academy seeks papers on the topic of Eastern Orthodox Studies, and the deadline for submissions is March 1. Three primary subtopics have been identified: “Evangelicals, Eastern Orthodox Christians, and ‘Traditional Values’: A Global Alliance?”; “Sergii Bulgakov and Modern Western Theology”; and “Peacemaking and Hospitality in Middle Eastern Christianity: Accommodating Difference in the Eastern Christian Traditions.” More information is available here. Those interested in submitting proposals can do so here.

 

Panel Discussion: “Muslims and the Making of America” (March 14)

On March 14, the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs, in conjunction with Baylor University Press, is co-sponsoring a panel discussion of Amir Hussain’s new book Muslims and the Making of America at the National Press Club in Washington D.C. A description of the event follows:

muslims-and-the-making-of-americaAmerican Muslim identity presently hangs under a dark cloud of suspicion. Ironically, as Amir Hussain demonstrates, there has never been an America without Muslims. The American tapestry is woven, in part, with Muslim threads.
Amir Hussain, professor of theological studies at Loyola Marymount University, will appear on a panel to discuss his recent book, Muslims and the Making of America (2016). He will be joined by Melissa Rogers, most recently known for her work as special assistant to the president and executive director of the White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships during the Obama administration, and Rebecca Samuel Shah, research professor at the Institute for Studies of Religion at Baylor University and associate director of the Religious Freedom Institute’s South and Southeast Asia Action Team. The panelists will discuss Muslim American identity, Muslim contributions to America, religious freedom and other First Amendment issues, and the social and political impact of cultural stereotypes of Muslim identity. The forum will be open to questions from the audience.
Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be served at 6:00 p.m. in the National Press Club’s Holeman Lounge before the panel commences at 6:45 p.m. Immediately following the panel, Hussain will host a book signing where copies of his book will be available.
The panel is co-sponsored by Baylor University Press and the Religious Freedom Research Project of the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs.
More information on the event can be found here.

Conference on the EU, UK, and Freedom of Religion

Today, the European Union Office of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints hosts an event entitled European Union, United Kingdom, and Commonwealth: Cooperation in the Promotion of Freedom of Religion or Belief in the Renaissance Brussels Hotel, Belgium. The host’s description of the event follows:

religious-freedom-eventWe are proud to host an outstanding event on Article 18 UDHR from a truly international perspective.

We will be honoured to hear from our keynote speaker, Dr. Ján Figel’, Special Envoy for the promotion of freedom of religion or belief (‘FoRB’) outside the European Union. His perspective on #FoRB is informed by his rich international experience in his current role as well as by his previous experience within the #EU.

Dr. Figel’ will be joined by a panel chaired by Mr. Andrew Lewer, Member of the European Parliament and Member of the European Parliament Intergroup on FoRB & Religious Tolerance. Speakers with international perspectives from the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth will include: Mr. David Rutley,Member of the United Kingdom Parliament for Macclesfield and Member of the UK All-Party Parliamentary Group on FoRB (tbc); Mr. Simon McCrossan, barrister and Head of Policy with the United Kingdom Evangelical Alliance; Professor Neville Rochow SC, Government Relations Representative in our EU Office, a barrister from Australia with wide-ranging experience in FoRB in that country prior to joining us here in the EU; Professor Pasquale Annichino, Fellow Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute, and Member of the Italian Council for the relationships with Muslim Communities at the Italian Ministry of Interior.

Invitations to actively participate have been extended also to representatives of the European External Action Service and Members of the European Parliament, diplomats and Brussels-based ambassadors from Commonwealth countries. Updates on the program will be posted on our event page.

Panel Discussion: “Religious Freedom and Anti-Semitism in Contemporary Europe” (Feb. 9)

On Thursday February 9, The King’s College and Princeton University’s James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions is sponsoring a panel discussion titled “Religious Freedom and Anti-Semitism in Contemporary Europe” at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in New York. A description of the event follows:

Religious Freedom and Anti-Semitism in Contemporary Europe.pngFollowing the Second World War, the world said “never again” to the hatred that produced the Holocaust, but Anti-Semitism, which was never fully eradicated in Europe, has returned with a vengeance. According to the French Interior Ministry, over 50 percent of France’s bias motivated crimes in 2014 targeted Jews, even though French Jewry makes up less than one percent of the population. The currents driving this tragedy across Europe are several: the scapegoating of Jews for social decline by right-wing nationalists; the radicalization of Muslim immigrants by certain extremist Imams goading them to violence; and the “open-mindedness” of secularized Europe, which refuses to acknowledge Islamist violence and combat it. This toxic environment has led some to ask whether the Jews living in Europe today may soon leave the continent altogether.

Please join us on Thursday evening, February 9th for a panel discussion at the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan. Co-sponsored by The King’s College and Princeton University’s James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, the panel will explore the sources of and possible responses to the revival of Anti-Semitism in Europe.

Panelists
Rabbi Dr. David G. Dalin, Author and Professor Emeritus of History and Politics at Ave Maria University
Professor Mary Ann Glendon
, Learned Hand Professor of Law at Harvard Law School
Rabbi Dr. Meir Y. Soloveichik, Rabbi at Congregation Shearith Israel

Moderator
Professor Robert P. George, McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence, Director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University

More information on the event can be found here.

 

Lecture: “The Reformation and Law: 500th Anniversary Perspectives” (Apr. 3-4)

In April,  The Center for the Study of Law and Religion at Emory University will host a lecture titled “The Reformation and Law: 500th Anniversary Perspectives.” A brief description of the lecture follows:

emory-university-eventThis lecture, the fourth installment in The McDonald Distinguished Scholar Lectures on Christian Scholarship, will be held April 3 and 4, 2017.

“The Reformation and Law: 500th Anniversary Perspectives,” will be a scholarly celebration of the contributions of the Protestant Reformation to the transformation of theology, art, music, liturgy, church life, politics, economics, and the law. The celebration will include a Bach organ concert by Timothy Albrecht and Presentation of Reformation archives by Pat Graham.

More information on the lecture can be found here.

Event Announcement: Religion and the Presidents of Our Time

On January 31st, the Columbia Club of New York will host a reception and presentation by David L. Holmes about current, past, and future American presidents and the role of religion in American public life.  More information follows below:

The Columbia Club is proud to present David L. Holmes ’71, and his presentation on the religion of past presidents and an analysis on the religion of President-elect, Donald Trump. Morality, values and faith play integral roles in American politics. Beginning with Dwight Eisenhower’s background in the Jehovah’s Witnesses, Richard Nixon’s secret Unitarianism and Bill Clinton’s Saturday night/Sunday morning personae, David L. Holmes will conclude by discussing the religious faith of the nation’s newly inaugurated 45th president.

To learn more, and to register, please visit this page.

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