Movsesian Cited by Justice Gorsuch in today’s Supreme Court Opinion on Free Speech and Severability

A point of personal privilege and congratulations to Mark, whose article, Severability in Statutes and Contracts, 30 Ga. L. Rev. 31 (1994), was cited by Justice Gorsuch in his opinion concurring in the judgment in part and dissenting in part in today’s Supreme Court case, Barr v. American Association of Political Consultants! The case is about the constitutionality of Congress’s regulation of “robocalls” and whether the offending part of the statute could be severed.

Professors Panel from JCLS/CLR Symposium on History of Catholic Legal Education

Here is the “Professors Panel” (video and audio) from the joint Journal of Catholic Legal Studies and Center for Law and Religion symposium on the history and future of Catholic legal education. Our panelists were Professors Angela Carmella, Teresa Collett, Richard Garnett, Jeffrey Pojanowski, and Amy Uelman. It was a pleasure to host this conference on the forthcoming book on the subject by Professors John Breen and Lee Strang.

JCLS/CLR Symposium, Deans Panel: A History of Catholic Legal Education

On February 14, 2020, the Journal of Catholic Legal Studies and the Center for Law and Religion co-hosted a conference on a forthcoming book by Professors John Breen (Loyala University Chicago) and Lee Strang (University of Toledo), “A Light Unseen: A History of Catholic Legal Education.” The symposium consisted of a “Deans Panel” and a “Professors Panel.”

Here is the audio of the Deans Panel, featuring very interesting commentary on the state and future of Catholic legal education from Deans Kathleen Boozang (Seton Hall), Marcus Cole (Notre Dame), Vincent Rougeau (Boston College), Michael Simons (St. John’s), William Treanor (Georgetown), and Robert Vischer (St. Thomas).

Movsesian Teaches Class at Moscow State University

I had a wonderful time this morning, teaching a (virtual!) class at Lomonosov Moscow State University on the COVID epidemic and religious exemptions under the US Constitution. Thanks to Professor Gayane Davidyan for inviting me and to her students for their wonderful, thoughtful questions. Lomonsov will post the class on YouTube soon, and I’ll link it when it appears.

Hall Reviews “The Cambridge Companion to the First Amendment and Religious Liberty”

Professor Mark David Hall has this review of The Cambridge Companion to the First Amendment and Religious Liberty, edited by Professors Michael Breidenbach and Owen Anderson. I was pleased to contribute a chapter to the book.

Announcing the Fifth Biennial Colloquium in Law & Religion (Fall 2020)

The Center for Law and Religion is delighted to announce the lineup for the fifth biennial Colloquium in Law and Religion, scheduled for Fall 2020. The Colloquium brings outside scholars and jurists to St. John’s to teach a seminar for selected students. Speakers present drafts on law and religion; students are graded on the basis of response papers and class participation. The Fall 2020 Colloquium will coincide with the Center’s tenth anniversary. A celebration is planned for October.

This year’s Colloquium speakers are Judges Steven Menashi and Michael Park of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and Professors Jed Atkins (Duke University); Stephanie Barclay (Brigham Young University); Paul Horwitz (University of Alabama); Amy Sepinwall (University of Pennsylvania); and Carter Snead (University of Notre Dame).

For more information about the Colloquium, please contact Center Co-Directors Mark Movsesian and Marc DeGirolami.

Notre Dame Conference on Constitutions, Peoples, and Sovereignty

I was delighted to participate last week in this conference on “Constitutions, Peoples, and Sovereignty,” organized by Professor Jeff Pojanowski and co-sponsored by Notre Dame’s Program on Constitutional Structure and the Oxford Programme for the Foundations of Law and Constitutional Government. The conference was a day of discussion about a series of papers, one of which was my First Amendment Traditionalism.

The Cambridge Companion to the First Amendment and Religious Liberty (2020)

This volume is now available for purchase, with many worthwhile and interesting contributions. I have an essay in here as well, The Two Separations.

Check it out!

Movsesian on Espinoza

Over at Public Discourse today, I have an essay that attempts to predict the outcome in Espinoza v. Montana Dep’t of Revenue, the Blaine Amendment case currently under review at SCOTUS. (Marc and I will have a new podcast about the case up shortly). Here’s a summary of the essay:

The US Supreme Court seems likely to rule in a way school-choice advocates will welcome. The Court will likely overrule the Montana court and hold a ban on scholarships for students at religiously affiliated schools unconstitutional—an important ruling, to be sure. But a sweeping opinion seems unlikely. Rather, Espinoza is shaping up to be one of those closely divided, narrow decisions that have become familiar in the Court’s Religion Clause jurisprudence.

Predicting the outcome of a case on the basis of oral argument is tricky, but I’m foolhardy enough to try. Let’s see how I do.

Conference on Catholic Legal Education: “A Light Unseen”

On February 14, the Center will co-host, along with the Journal of Catholic Legal Studies, a conference on a forthcoming book by Professors John Breen (Loyala University Chicago) and Lee Strang (University of Toledo), “A Light Unseen: A History of Catholic Legal Education.” Panelists include Deans Kathleen Boozang (Seton Hall), Marcus Cole (Notre Dame), Vincent Rougeau (Boston College), Michael Simons (St. John’s), William Treanor (Georgetown), and Robert Vischer (St. Thomas), and Professors Angela Carmella (Seton Hall), Teresa Collett (St. Thomas), Richard Garnett (Notre Dame), Jeff Pojanowski (Notre Dame), and Amy Uelmen (Georgetown). Details and registration are at this link. Hope you can join us!

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