Ismail, “Saudi Clerics and Shi’a Islam”

In March, Oxford University Press will release “Saudi Clerics and Shi’a Islam” by Raihan Ismail (Centre for Arab and Islamic Studies). The publisher’s description follows:

The Saudi “ulama” are known for their strong opposition to Shi’a theology, Shi’a communities in Saudi Arabia, and external Shi’a influences such as Iran and Hezbollah. Their potent hostility, combined with the influence of the ‘ulama’ within the Saudi state and the Muslim world, has led some commentators to blame the Saudi ‘ulama’ for what they see as growing sectarian conflict in the Middle East. However, there is very little understanding of what reasoning lies behind the positions of the ‘ulama’ and there is a significant gap in the literature dealing with the polemics directed at the Shi’a by the Saudi religious establishment.

In Saudi Clerics and Shi’a Islam, Raihan Ismail looks at the discourse of the Saudi “ulama” regarding Shiism and Shi’a communities, analysing their sermons, lectures, publications and religious rulings. The book finds that the attitudes of the “ulama” are not only governed by their theological convictions regarding Shiism, but are motivated by political events involving the Shi’a within the Saudi state and abroad. It also discovers that political events affect the intensity and frequency of the rhetoric of the ulama at any given time.

Ridgeon, “Shi’i Islam and Identity”

I.B. Tauris Publishing has published Shi’i Islam and Identity: Religion, Politics and Change in the Global Muslim Community (2012) by Lloyd Ridgeon (University of Glasgow).  The publisher’s description follows.Shii-Islam-and-Identity

The contemporary world is increasingly regarded as a global community in which traditional patterns of social organisation, faith and practice are rapidly being transformed. These changes are evident in many religious traditions, and Shi’i Islam is no exception. This book seeks to investigate the nature of contemporary Shi’ism, focusing on the creation of identities – showing the diversity of thought within the Shi’i world, the transnational nature of Shi’i networks, and the forces of tradition and modernity influencing current developments in Shi’i identity. Increasing contacts between East and West have made the presence of Shi’ism more visible in the modern world, especially in Europe. Shi’i Islam and Identity shows that it is no longer sufficient to speak of a ‘Shi’i Crescent’; rather, Shi’i worlds range from Senegal, Afghanistan, Iran and Iraq, to Turkey, Albania and European capitals such as London and Berlin.

%d bloggers like this: